In the Buckeye State, the right to homeschool is guaranteed by several important aspects of Ohio homeschooling laws. In Ohio, the public school system seems to do a good job educating students. The state earns a national ranking in the top 40% of public schools (16 out of 51) from Alec.org, based on above average test scores, high school graduation rate, and other criteria. Based on this and Ohio homeschooling laws, it seems parents thus have a real educational choice available. They can choose between a good public school system or homeschooling laws that do impose some restrictions but are not too overly burdensome.

Ohio’s average public school test scores in fourth grade math and reading are significantly above the national average. Scores on the ACT and the SAT are somewhat above average as well. The average high school graduation rate in the Buckeye state is 75.9%, nearly 6 points higher than the national average.

Under Ohio homeschooling laws, the primary restriction is that parents must notify their superintendent each year that they plan to homeschool. Annual notification laws are pretty standard in many states. Under OH homeschool requirements, it need only include the year, name and address of the parent and full name and birth date of their child and name and address of whoever will be teaching the child.

OH homeschool requirements also add that parents include a statement of assurance that the curriculum will include the mandatory 15 subjects, mandatory 900 hours of instruction, and that the teacher meets the minimum qualifications. The teacher qualifications are to possess a high school diploma or a GED or other equivalency exam. If they do not, they can work under the supervision of a person with a college degree “until children’s test scores show minimum proficiency.”

Based on a national graduation rate of 70% and an OH rate of 76%, this means that 24 to 30% of parents would be unable to homeschool their own children without supervision. This is a restriction considered unnecessary in a number of other states. However, it does appear that under OH homeschool requirements, this restriction is lifted once the children pass a standardized test with good marks.

Under Ohio homeschooling laws, parents must assess their children’s progress annually. They have three options for doing so, standardized tests; a written narrative and portfolio evaluated by teacher with a certificate or license or someone else parent and superintendent agree upon; or an alternative assessment that the parents and superintendent agree upon.

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